6. Conservation in Mauritius and Rodrigues: Challenges and Achievements from Two Ecologically Devastated Oceanic Islands

  1. Peter H. Raven3,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi4 and
  3. Luke Gibson4
  1. F.B. Vincent Florens

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch6

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Florens, F.B. V. (2013) Conservation in Mauritius and Rodrigues: Challenges and Achievements from Two Ecologically Devastated Oceanic Islands, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 4

    National University of Singapore

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity conservation;
  • Mauritius;
  • Rodrigues

Summary

Mauritius and Rodrigues are among the last places on earth to have been reached by humans and yet are also among the most ecologically devastated, thus illustrating our great propensity to destroy the environment. Today, conservation approaches and techniques continue to be innovated, developed, and tested on the two islands, which consequently represent a kind of “conservation laboratory” for the tropics. Despite some notable successes, conservation problems on the islands persist and are being exacerbated by a low and declining commitment of the government to the conservation of biodiversity. In spite of the commitment of many government officers and bodies to addressing conservation challenges, their efforts are often curtailed by interference intense enough to make the officers yield to the whims of politicians and end up backing decisions that are detrimental to conservation.