7. Design and Outcomes of Community Forest Conservation Initiatives in Cross River State of Nigeria: A Foundation for REDD+?

  1. Peter H. Raven4,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi5 and
  3. Luke Gibson5
  1. Sylvanus Abua1,
  2. Robert Spencer2 and
  3. Dimitrina Spencer3

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch7

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Abua, S., Spencer, R. and Spencer, D. (2013) Design and Outcomes of Community Forest Conservation Initiatives in Cross River State of Nigeria: A Foundation for REDD+?, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 5

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. 1

    Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

  2. 2

    Environmental Consultant, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

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Keywords:

  • community forest conservation;
  • cross river state (CRS);
  • REDD+ approach;
  • southeast Nigeria;
  • system builder

Summary

This chapter reflects on a series of donor‐funded interventions in the forestry sector in Cross River State (CRS), southeast Nigeria. It explores some of the key challenges and opportunities to sustaining outputs and making an impact, particularly with regards to capacity. The chapter shows that today, looking back, certain project outputs could be evaluated as poor but the observable and potential impacts may form a useful basis on which to build the foundations for an equitable REDD+ system from the bottom up. It presents a case study on local system builders. The chapter concludes with lessons learned from the successes and failures of community forestry interventions in CRS to inform the design of further interventions in Nigeria as it prepares for a long‐term engagement with the REDD+ approach, as well as in other developing tropical countries.