6. Clinical significance of blood group antibodies

  1. Geoff Daniels PhD, FRCPath Consultant Clinical Scientist and Head of Diagnostics1 and
  2. Imelda Bromilow MSc, CBiol Scientific Consultant2

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118688915.ch6

Essential Guide to Blood Groups, Third Edition

Essential Guide to Blood Groups, Third Edition

How to Cite

Daniels, G. and Bromilow, I. (eds) (2013) Clinical significance of blood group antibodies, in Essential Guide to Blood Groups, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118688915.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 1

    IBGRL, Bristol Institute for Transfusion Services, NHS Blood and Transplant, Bristol, UK

  2. 2

    Liverpool, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 3 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118688922

Online ISBN: 9781118688915

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Keywords:

  • antigen;
  • haemolytic anaemia (HA);
  • haemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR);
  • HDFN;
  • monoclonal antibodies

Summary

Most human antibodies with which we are familiar are polyclonal in origin, being of broader specificity than monoclonal antibodies, which can have single epitope specificity. These antibodies can be of importance in certain clinical situations such as the ones described briefly as follows: Haemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR), Haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) and Haemolytic anaemia (HA). These antibodies may be non-specific or may possess a defined specificity, often against a high incidence antigen. All antibody molecules are similar in overall structure, having a common core arrangement of two identical light chains, either κ (kappa) or λ (lambda) and two identical heavy chains, which denote the isotype of the antibody. This chapter describes factors affecting the clinical significance of antibodies.