16. Rehydration and Recovery After Exercise

  1. Ronald J. Maughan PhD
  1. Susan M. Shirreffs

Published Online: 11 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118692318.ch16

The Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine: An IOC Medical Commission Publication, Volume 19

The Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine: An IOC Medical Commission Publication, Volume 19

How to Cite

Shirreffs, S. M. (2013) Rehydration and Recovery After Exercise, in The Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine: An IOC Medical Commission Publication, Volume 19 (ed R. J. Maughan), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118692318.ch16

Author Information

  1. GlaxoSmithKline, Brentford, Middlesex, UK, and School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 OCT 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118275764

Online ISBN: 9781118692318

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Keywords:

  • beverage composition;
  • exercise capacity;
  • post-exercise rehydration;
  • rehydration process

Summary

This chapter deals with the primary factors influencing the rehydration process after exercise. These factors include the volume and composition of the fluid consumed. Studies conducted by Shirreffs and Maughan demonstrated an interaction between the drink volume consumed and its sodium content. A section on beverage composition describes the role of sodium in rehydration after exercise. No negative effect of including modest amounts of potassium in rehydration drinks has been demonstrated and indeed potassium in small quantities is an ingredient in most commercially available sports drinks that are promoted for post-exercise rehydration. The majority of scientific studies in the area of post-exercise rehydration and recovery have prescribed a fixed volume of fluid that was consumed within a fixed period of time according to a predetermined schedule.