11. Biomaterials for Directed Differentiation

  1. Charles C. Hong4,
  2. Ada S. Ao5 and
  3. Jijun Hao6
  1. Xintong Wang1,
  2. Angela L. Zachman1,
  3. Simon Maltais2 and
  4. Hak-Joon Sung3

Published Online: 4 JUL 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118695746.ch11

Chemical Biology in Regenerative Medicine: Bridging Stem Cells and Future Therapies

Chemical Biology in Regenerative Medicine: Bridging Stem Cells and Future Therapies

How to Cite

Wang, X., Zachman, A. L., Maltais, S. and Sung, H.-J. (2014) Biomaterials for Directed Differentiation, in Chemical Biology in Regenerative Medicine: Bridging Stem Cells and Future Therapies (eds C. C. Hong, A. S. Ao and J. Hao), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118695746.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, USA

  2. 5

    Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, USA

  3. 6

    College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Cardiac Surgery, Vanderbilt University, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JUL 2014
  2. Published Print: 15 AUG 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118349595

Online ISBN: 9781118695746

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Keywords:

  • biomaterial;
  • stem cell;
  • differentiation;
  • regenerative medicine;
  • polymer;
  • tissue engineering;
  • scaffold

Summary

Stem cells are immature cells that can potentially differentiate into multiple specialized cell types. The wonderful properties of stem cells, such as the ability to undergo both self-renewal and differentiation, make them a great cell source for regenerative medicine. The application of stem cells to tissue regeneration requires the development of suitable scaffolds to support their growth and differentiation of to the target cell type. The scaffolds should ideally be biocompatible, biodegradable, and mechanically and morphologically mimetic to the stem cell niche. Thus, both natural and synthetic biomaterials have been used for stem cell-based tissue engineering, with exciting successes. In this chapter, we discuss the progress of biomaterial-directed stem cell differentiation over the past 10 years, aiming to provide a comprehensive but concise review of the biomaterials chosen for application to regenerative medicine.