10. Developing Molecular Copper Complexes for Water Oxidation

  1. Antoni Llobet
  1. Shoshanna M. Barnett,
  2. Christopher R. Waidmann,
  3. Margaret L. Scheuermann,
  4. Jared C. Nesvet,
  5. Karen Goldberg and
  6. James M. Mayer

Published Online: 18 APR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118698648.ch10

Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes

Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes

How to Cite

Barnett, S. M., Waidmann, C. R., Scheuermann, M. L., Nesvet, J. C., Goldberg, K. and Mayer, J. M. (2014) Developing Molecular Copper Complexes for Water Oxidation, in Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes (ed A. Llobet), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118698648.ch10

Editor Information

  1. Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Tarragona, Spain

Author Information

  1. Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 APR 2014
  2. Published Print: 16 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118413371

Online ISBN: 9781118698648

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Keywords:

  • aqueous system;
  • biomimetic approach;
  • electrocatalysis;
  • molecular copper complexes;
  • water oxidation catalysts (WOCs)

Summary

This chapter focuses on the development of the first copper water oxidation catalysts (WOCs). It discusses the challenges of combining strong oxidants and bases. The chapter describes the development of a water oxidation electrocatalyst. The studies in the chapter were motivated by the biomimetic chemistry, although recent experiments indicate that the electrocatalysis has a mechanism different from the path originally envisioned. The chapter opens with a discussion on a biomimetic approach. Next, it talks about an aqueous system: electrocatalysis with (bpy)Cu(II) complexes. In selecting the best ligand for electrocatalysis, several criteria must be considered. A good WOC ligand should be robust in order to withstand highly oxidative conditions. Catalysis is rapid and appears to be robust, although it occurs at somewhat high overpotentials. Recent reports from Meyer and coworkers show that other copper complexes, with carbonate, phosphate, or tripeptide ligands, are also water oxidation electrocatalysts.