8. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysts from Iron

  1. Antoni Llobet
  1. W. Chadwick Ellis1,
  2. Neal D. McDaniel2 and
  3. Stefan Bernhard3

Published Online: 18 APR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118698648.ch8

Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes

Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes

How to Cite

Chadwick Ellis, W., McDaniel, N. D. and Bernhard, S. (2014) Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysts from Iron, in Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes (ed A. Llobet), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118698648.ch8

Editor Information

  1. Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Tarragona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Phillips 66, Bartlesville, OK, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 APR 2014
  2. Published Print: 16 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118413371

Online ISBN: 9781118698648

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Keywords:

  • Fe-mcp;
  • Fe-tetrasulfophthalocyanine;
  • Fe2O3;
  • intramolecular oxidative degradation;
  • iron;
  • ironcentered tetraamido macrocyclic ligands (Fe-TAML);
  • Oxidation Catalysts;
  • water oxidation catalysts (WOC)s

Summary

This chapter highlights the catalysis of water oxidation by iron. Elizarova and coworkers reported oxygen evolution from a number of metallophthalocyanine complexes in 1981. Collins and coworkers engineered iron-centered tetraamido macrocyclic ligands (Fe-TAMLs) to resist intramolecular oxidative degradation and hydrolysis. In order to improve the performance of Fe-TAMLs as water oxidation catalysts (WOCs), future attention should be devoted to: (i) the origin of the dichotomous rate behavior; (ii) the mechanism of catalyst deactivation and enhancement of catalyst longevity; and (iii) the mechanism of Fe-TAML-catalyzed water oxidation and the nature of the active species. Fillol and coworkers reported significant activity towards water oxidation from several iron complexes of modular, tetradentate nitrogen-based ligands. The Lau group very recently reported water oxidation activity from a number of iron-containing compounds, which they attribute ultimately to the uncontrolled formation of Fe2O3 particles from their various precursors.