9. CURRENT AND FUTURE STATE OF ENERGY PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION

  1. Anne E. Marteel-Parrish1 and
  2. Martin A. Abraham2

Published Online: 31 JAN 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118720011.ch9

Green Chemistry and Engineering: A Pathway to Sustainability

Green Chemistry and Engineering: A Pathway to Sustainability

How to Cite

Marteel-Parrish, A. E. and Abraham, M. A. (2013) CURRENT AND FUTURE STATE OF ENERGY PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION, in Green Chemistry and Engineering: A Pathway to Sustainability, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, NJ. doi: 10.1002/9781118720011.ch9

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemistry, Washington College

  2. 2

    College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Youngstown State University

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2014
  2. Published Print: 28 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470413265

Online ISBN: 9781118720011

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Keywords:

  • energy consumption;
  • energy production;
  • energy transfer;
  • thermodynamic function

Summary

The world's reliance on fossil resources and continued economic growth pose great threats to the sustainability of the world's energy production. To measure the total heat or energy emitted or consumed by a reaction, we use a thermodynamic function called enthalpy. Traditional chemical processing relies on the transfer of energy in the form of heat or work, but it is also possible to use other processes to transfer the necessary energy to promote a chemical reaction. Because the energy transfer may be more efficient or targeted, the yield and selectivity can be improved, often eliminating the need for a catalyst, reducing the separation requirements, and eliminating waste. This chapter evaluates several of these less common energy transfer techniques. On average, about 14% of the total energy consumed in the United States is devoted to heating water and accounts for one-third of the average total household energy consumption.