1. Structure and Physiology

  1. Dianne M. Broussard

Published Online: 23 AUG 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118730133.ch1

The Cerebellum: Learning Movement, Language, and Social Skills

The Cerebellum: Learning Movement, Language, and Social Skills

How to Cite

Broussard, D. M. (2013) Structure and Physiology, in The Cerebellum: Learning Movement, Language, and Social Skills, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118730133.ch1

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 AUG 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 AUG 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118125632

Online ISBN: 9781118730133

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Keywords:

  • afferent connections;
  • anatomy;
  • cerebellar cortex;
  • cerebellum;
  • deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN);
  • efferent connections;
  • physiology

Summary

This chapter talks about the anatomy and physiology of the cerebellar cortex. Unlike the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum retains the very stereotyped cytoarchitecture in all of its subdivisions. There are two major ways to subdivide the cerebellum. First, division of the cerebellum up along crosswise lines, into lobes. Second, division of it lengthwise, into zones. Both of these schemes are meaningful in terms of cerebellar function. The P-cells of the cerebellar cortex have axons that leave the cortex and terminate in the vestibular nuclei and in special clusters of cells, the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), which are located at the base of the cerebellum. Finally, the chapter deals with the afferent and efferent connections of the cerebellum.