10. Water, Transpiration, and Gas Exchange

  1. Paul H. Moore and
  2. Frederik C. Botha
  1. David A. Grantz

Published Online: 13 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118771280.ch10

Sugarcane: Physiology, Biochemistry, and Functional Biology

Sugarcane: Physiology, Biochemistry, and Functional Biology

How to Cite

Grantz, D. A. (2013) Water, Transpiration, and Gas Exchange, in Sugarcane: Physiology, Biochemistry, and Functional Biology (eds P. H. Moore and F. C. Botha), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118771280.ch10

Author Information

  1. Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 DEC 2013
  2. Published Print: 6 DEC 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813821214

Online ISBN: 9781118771280

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Keywords:

  • gas exchange;
  • stomatal regulation;
  • sugarcane;
  • transpiration;
  • water

Summary

Water moves from soil to roots, up through the shoot and leaves, and into the atmosphere down a coherent gradient in the chemical potential of water. The rate of transpiration is governed by conductance and by energy inputs both to evaporate leaf water and to remove water vapor from the near-leaf environment. This chapter talks about the occurrence, pathways, and regulation of water exchange between sugarcane and its edaphic and atmospheric environments in an ecophysiological context. It focuses on transpiration through leaf stomata and cuticle, on a leaf area basis from individual leaves and transpiration through leaf stomata and cuticle, on a land surface area basis from extensive canopies. Gas exchange in sugarcane is driven by the interaction of leaves with the aerial environment, involving exchange of both mass and energy. Despite its considerable complexity, stomatal regulation is one of the factors controlling gas exchange.