10. Emergency public health

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH6,
  3. James Scott MD7 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH8
  1. Rebecca Katz1,
  2. Anthony Macintyre2 and
  3. Joseph Barbera2,3,4

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch10

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Katz, R., Macintyre, A. and Barbera, J. (2014) Emergency public health, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 6

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 7

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 8

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The George Washington University, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, USA

  3. 3

    Engineering Management (Crisis and Emergency Management), The George Washington University, USA

  4. 4

    Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management, Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering The George Washington University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

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Keywords:

  • emergency public health;
  • emergency response;
  • public health functions;
  • public health practitioners

Summary

The role of public health in emergencies, as part of the larger response effort, or as the lead discipline, has been difficult to characterize. In one instance, public health preparedness has been defined as having the capacities, plans, and procedures in place to detect, respond, and recover from acute public health emergencies that have the capacity to overwhelm routine capabilities. As with other disciplines, however, alternate approaches have become necessary over the past two decades to address emerging threats and to enhance emergency response to already recognized hazards. New approaches to management of complex systems, information management, and prioritization of efforts are necessary and can be enhanced through the adaptation of concepts from other response disciplines. These concepts could serve not only to improve the execution of emergency public health functions, but also to increase integration of efforts with these other emergency response disciplines.