11. The role of the emergency department in care coordination

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE2,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH3,
  3. James Scott MD4 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH5
  1. Emily R. Carrier

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch11

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Carrier, E. R. (2014) The role of the emergency department in care coordination, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 4

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 5

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. Center for Studying Health System Change, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

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Keywords:

  • care coordination;
  • community-based physicians;
  • emergency department (ED);
  • health care system;
  • hospitals

Summary

Care coordination is important for high-quality emergency care and consumes significant amounts of emergency provider time. Care coordination in emergency departments (ED) occurs at three levels: within EDs, hospitals and communities. This chapter discusses best practices in ED team-based care and handoffs, but the primary focus is coordination of care with community-based physicians. As Health care system evolves towards greater financial incentives for managing utilization and meeting quality standards, ED providers may be pressured to minimize errors, avoid admissions and readmissions, limit their use of some services, and shift others from the hospital to less costly settings. Some of the barriers to care coordination (e.g., diminishing opportunities for regular interactions between ED-based and community-based providers) are part of larger trends in health care delivery and would be extremely difficult to reverse. ED providers may need to think creatively and develop new strategies for coordinating care.