2. Ten common misconceptions about emergency care

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE3,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH4,
  3. James Scott MD5 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH6
  1. Dana R. Sax1 and
  2. Robert Shesser2

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch2

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Sax, D. R. and Shesser, R. (2014) Ten common misconceptions about emergency care, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 4

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 5

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 6

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Kaiser East Bay Medical Center, CA

  2. 2

    Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

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Keywords:

  • emergency care;
  • emergency departments (EDs);
  • emergency physician

Summary

This chapter presents misconceptions about emergency care. One of the misconceptions is that emergency departments (EDs) are crowded because large numbers of medically indigent patients use EDs for “primary care”. Second misconception is that EDs are inherently expensive relative to alternative outpatient settings for many visit categories. Third one is that ED frequent users just use ED for their care and have no longitudinal care relationships with other doctors. Fourth one is that there are generally accepted guidelines about what constitutes “appropriate” ED use. Fifth one is that there are clear-cut guidelines about which ED patients should be admitted to the hospital. Sixth one is that care for most conditions treated in the ED is carefully measured and reported to the public. Seventh one is that emergency physicians are employed by the hospital and have a practice structure similar to other physicians at the hospital.