3. International perspectives on emergency care

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE15,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH16,
  3. James Scott MD17 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH18
  1. Jameel Abualenain1,2,
  2. Drew Richardson3,
  3. David Mountain4,5,
  4. Samuel Vaillancourt6,
  5. Michael Schull7,8,9,
  6. Phillip Anderson10,
  7. Eric Revue11,
  8. Brijal Patel1,
  9. Ali Pourmand1,
  10. Hamid Shokoohi1,
  11. Shingo Hori12,
  12. Lit-Sin Quek13 and
  13. Suzanne Mason14

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch3

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Abualenain, J., Richardson, D., Mountain, D., Vaillancourt, S., Schull, M., Anderson, P., Revue, E., Patel, B., Pourmand, A., Shokoohi, H., Hori, S., Quek, L.-S. and Mason, S. (2014) International perspectives on emergency care, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 15

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 16

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 17

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 18

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, USA

  2. 2

    King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

  3. 3

    Emergency Department, Australian National University Medical School, Australia

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Western Australia, Australia

  5. 5

    Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Emergency Department, Australia

  6. 6

    Emergency Department and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Canada

  7. 7

    Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

  8. 8

    Emergency Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Canada

  9. 9

    Department of Emergency Services, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Canada

  10. 10

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, USA

  11. 11

    Emergency Department and Prehospital EMS (SMUR), France

  12. 12

    Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Keio University, School of Medicine, Japan

  13. 13

    Alexandra Hospital, Juronghealth Services, Singapore

  14. 14

    EMR is group, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Australia;
  • Canada;
  • Denmark;
  • emergency care;
  • France;
  • India;
  • Iran;
  • Japan;
  • Singapore;
  • United Kingdom

Summary

This chapter describes emergency care systems across nine countries outside of the United States: Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, India, Iran, Japan, Singapore, and the United Kingdom. In each case, a local author, who is an emergency care leader in his country, provides some background and perspectives about their emergency care systems, how they are financed, crowding issues, and other challenges. Some of these countries have well-established emergency care systems with good infrastructure, workforce, and supportive societies. Emergency department (ED) crowding is almost a universal theme in the included countries regardless of how well developed the country. Many of these countries established measures and interventions to reduce ED crowding with variable success and outcomes.