7. Simulation in emergency care

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE3,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH4,
  3. James Scott MD5 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH6
  1. Claudia Ranniger1 and
  2. Keith E. Littlewood2

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch7

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Ranniger, C. and Littlewood, K. E. (2014) Simulation in emergency care, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 4

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 5

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 6

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Emergency Medicine, USA

  2. 2

    School of Medicine, University of Virginia, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

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Keywords:

  • clinical training;
  • emergency care;
  • emergency medicine;
  • environmental assessment;
  • health care outcomes;
  • medical simulation;
  • procedural skills training;
  • teamwork training

Summary

Simulation is a powerful tool for education and quality improvement in emergency medicine, and simulation-based curricula demonstrate improved health care outcomes in select domains. Simulation–the use of trained actors, anatomic models, computer-based task trainers and mannequins, and virtual reality environments to create realistic care scenarios in a purely educational setting–can provide crucial training in the procedural, communications, and teamwork skills required to provide high-quality medical care. This chapter identifies the performance gaps in clinical training, the learning theories, and evaluation methods that support the efficacy of simulation-based education, and discusses how simulation training is currently being used to address the identified performance gaps in emergency medicine.