8. Emergency care workforce projections

  1. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE3,
  2. Jameel Abualenain MD, MPH4,
  3. James Scott MD5 and
  4. Robert Shesser MD, MPH6
  1. James Scott1,
  2. Rachelle Pierre-Mathew2 and
  3. Drew Maurano2

Published Online: 30 MAY 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch8

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

Emergency Care and the Public's Health

How to Cite

Scott, J., Pierre-Mathew, R. and Maurano, D. (2014) Emergency care workforce projections, in Emergency Care and the Public's Health (eds J. M. Pines, J. Abualenain, J. Scott and R. Shesser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118779750.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Director, Office for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 4

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  3. 5

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The GeorgeWashington University School of Medicine and Health Science, Washington, DC, USA

  4. 6

    Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, The GeorgeWashington University, Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, The George Washington University, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2014
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118779804

Online ISBN: 9781118779750

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Keywords:

  • affordable care act (ACA);
  • emergency care;
  • emergency departments (EDs);
  • US population

Summary

The explosion of demand for emergency services by the US population is often ascribed to a failure of the health care system to provide adequate preventive and primary care. The utilization of emergency services has increased dramatically and there is little reason to expect that the demand will abate any time soon. Many attempts to limit or discourage the use of emergency departments (EDs) by more and more patients have failed, and there is strong evidence to suggest that, by virtue of demographics, disease patterns, and access, the need for emergency care will only continue to increase. The answer may be more emergency physicians, nurses, mid-level providers, technicians, and scribes, but new organizational structures are needed to optimize system efficiency.