3. The CERES and Other Principles

  1. Nikos Avlonas Founder and President1 and
  2. George P. Nassos Principal2

Published Online: 1 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118787472.ch3

Practical Sustainability Strategies: How to Gain a Competitive Advantage

Practical Sustainability Strategies: How to Gain a Competitive Advantage

How to Cite

Avlonas, N. and Nassos, G. P. (2013) The CERES and Other Principles, in Practical Sustainability Strategies: How to Gain a Competitive Advantage, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, NJ. doi: 10.1002/9781118787472.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Center for Sustainability & Excellence

  2. 2

    George P. Nassos & Associates, Inc.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118250440

Online ISBN: 9781118787472

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Keywords:

  • coalition for environmentally responsible economies (CERES);
  • Hannover principles;
  • precautionary principle;
  • roadmap expectations;
  • sustainability

Summary

There are many activities that an organization can undertake for the benefit of the environment. These environmentally beneficial activities embraced by corporations become the guidelines that are followed, better known as “principles.” Companies that adopt the coalition for environmentally responsible economies (CERES) principles such as protection of the biosphere and sustainable use of natural resources, can become environmentally conscious and eventually more sustainable. The CERES roadmap for sustainability refers to four key drivers of sustainability: (i) competition for natural resources, (ii) climate change, (iii) economic globalization, and (iv) connectivity and communications, and also lists 20 expectations for sustainability. While the CERES principles are probably the most recognized and implemented principles for manufacturing and service corporations, there have been many other principles proposed as part of the “sustainability revolution”, such as the Hannover principles and the precautionary principle.