5. Production and Bioactivity of Pectic Oligosaccharides from Fruit and Vegetable Biomass

  1. F. Javier Moreno Dr.4 and
  2. María Luz Sanz Dr.5
  1. Jesper Holck1,
  2. Arland T. Hotchkiss Jr.2,
  3. Anne S. Meyer1,
  4. Jørn D. Mikkelsen1 and
  5. Robert A. Rastall3

Published Online: 28 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118817360.ch5

Food Oligosaccharides: Production, Analysis and Bioactivity

Food Oligosaccharides: Production, Analysis and Bioactivity

How to Cite

Holck, J., Hotchkiss, A. T., Meyer, A. S., Mikkelsen, J. D. and Rastall, R. A. (2014) Production and Bioactivity of Pectic Oligosaccharides from Fruit and Vegetable Biomass, in Food Oligosaccharides: Production, Analysis and Bioactivity (eds F. J. Moreno and M. L. Sanz), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118817360.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Institute of Food Science Research, CIAL (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain

  2. 5

    Institute of General Organic Chemistry, IQOG (CSIC), Madrid, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

  2. 2

    US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Service, Wyndmoor, PA, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 28 MAR 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118426494

Online ISBN: 9781118817360

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Keywords:

  • pectic oligosaccharides;
  • extraction;
  • bioactivity;
  • prebiotics;
  • immunomodulation;
  • anti-cancer;
  • anti-adhesion

Summary

Pectin is abundant in various agro-industrial bio-resources such as citrus peel, apple pomace, cranberry pulp and sugar beet pulp. These materials can therefore be considered as a source of potential bioactive pectic oligosaccharides. This chapter reviews the various extraction and purification methods for production of the pectic oligosaccharides and the numerous bioactivities that include prebiotics, immunomodulation, anti-cancer, heavy metal excretion and anti-adhesion of food-borne pathogens. The convincing evidence of the potential for pectic oligosaccharides to be used as functional food ingredients now calls for significant attention to the selective and targeted production of well-defined structures from complex biomass.