4. Role of Nitrative DNA Damage in Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis

  1. Yusuke Hiraku1,
  2. Shosuke Kawanishi2 and
  3. Hiroshi Ohshima3
  1. Yusuke Hiraku and
  2. Shosuke Kawanishi

Published Online: 4 APR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118826621.ch4

Cancer and Inflammation Mechanisms: Chemical, Biological, and Clinical Aspects

Cancer and Inflammation Mechanisms: Chemical, Biological, and Clinical Aspects

How to Cite

Hiraku, Y. and Kawanishi, S. (2014) Role of Nitrative DNA Damage in Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis, in Cancer and Inflammation Mechanisms: Chemical, Biological, and Clinical Aspects (eds Y. Hiraku, S. Kawanishi and H. Ohshima), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118826621.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie, Japan

  2. 2

    Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie, Japan

  3. 3

    Department of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Integrated Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 APR 2014
  2. Published Print: 4 APR 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118160305

Online ISBN: 9781118826621

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Keywords:

  • chronic inflammation;
  • DNA lesion;
  • human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cervical cancer;
  • inflammation-related carcinogenesis;
  • iNOS inhibitors;
  • nitrative DNA damage

Summary

This chapter discusses the role of 8-nitroguanine in inflammation-related carcinogenesis caused by representative carcinogenic infectious agents such as parasites and viruses, and physicochemical factors. The staining intensity of 8-nitroguanine in soft tumor tissue was associated with poor patient prognosis. The chapter discusses the role of this DNA lesion in tumor progression. In addition to human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins, epidemiological studies have revealed that chronic inflammation is associated with cervical carcinogenesis. 8-Nitroguanine accumulates during the development of chronic inflammation to cancer as a common mechanism and raises the possibility that the DNA lesion can be used as a promising biomarker to assess the risk of inflammation-mediated carcinogenesis at the precancerous stage and predict the prognosis of cancer patients. Several animal experiments demonstrated that iNOS inhibitors, such as ONO-1714 and 1400W, effectively reduced inflammation-related carcinogenesis. Further study is required to clarify the precise molecular mechanisms of inflammation-related carcinogenesis.