17. Engineering Immune Responses to Allografts

  1. Anthony B. Brennan and
  2. Chelsea M. Kirschner
  1. Anthony W. Frei1,2 and
  2. Cherie L. Stabler2,3

Published Online: 28 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118843499.ch17

Bio-inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering

Bio-inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering

How to Cite

Frei, A. W. and Stabler, C. L. (2014) Engineering Immune Responses to Allografts, in Bio-inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering (eds A. B. Brennan and C. M. Kirschner), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118843499.ch17

Author Information

  1. 1

    Diabetes Research Institute, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA

  3. 3

    Diabetes Research Institute, Department of Surgery, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 11 APR 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118369364

Online ISBN: 9781118843499

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Keywords:

  • allografts;
  • immune acceptance;
  • immune responses

Summary

Allogeneic third-party cells or tissues have the highest marketing and translational potential in that they may be banked or precultured for alacrity of use. But allograft transplantation is restricted by the need for systemic immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of the foreign cells. One of the biggest challenges to the clinical success of allogeneic transplants is the interaction between the host immune system and the foreign transplanted cells. This chapter outlines the basic components of the immune system and its function under homeostasis, and discusses the unique response of the immune system to allografts. Immune acceptance of an allograft can be engineered using a number of complementary approaches, with each approach seeking to generate a graft site conducive to long-term acceptance. One approach is changing the anatomical location of the graft, an adjustable parameter when transplanting cells and smaller tissues.