16. Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation

  1. DVM, DACVECC Jamie M. Burkitt Creedon1 and
  2. BA, RVT, VTS (ECC) (Anesth) Harold Davis2
  1. Sean D. Smarick

Published Online: 18 JUL 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118997246.ch16

Advanced Monitoring and Procedures for Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care

Advanced Monitoring and Procedures for Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care

How to Cite

Smarick, S. D. (2012) Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation, in Advanced Monitoring and Procedures for Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care (eds J. M. Burkitt Creedon and H. Davis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118997246.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Chief, Emergency and Critical Care Service Red Bank Veterinary Hospital, Cherry Hill Cherry Hill, New Jersey

  2. 2

    Manager, Emergency and Critical Care Service William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital University of California, Davis Davis, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 JUL 2014
  2. Published Print: 8 JUN 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813813370

Online ISBN: 9781118997246

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Keywords:

  • cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA);
  • cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR);
  • electrocardiograph (ECG);
  • positive-pressure ventilation (PPV);
  • small animal;
  • ventricular fibrillation

Summary

Cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR) is the treatment to establish effective perfusion to the heart and brain with the ultimate goal of returning the patient to a normal life. Every veterinary practice from a vaccination clinic to a multispecialty referral hospital should have systems in place to address a cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Equipment and drugs used in CPCR should be readily available. A tackle box with CPCR supplies kept in a consistent place, usually near the surgery suites or treatment area, is the minimum recommended for nonemergency practices. Positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) is generally performed during in-hospital CPCR. An electrocardiograph (ECG) is recommended for all but the most basic of practices, as a significant proportion of electrical cardiac rhythms in a CPA warrant specialized treatment, namely, ventricular fibrillation. Equipment to assess the effectiveness of CPCR includes an end-tidal carbon dioxide monitor or a direct blood pressure monitor connected to an arterial catheter.