12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Children with Cancer

  1. Shulamith Kreitler2,3,4,
  2. Myriam Weyl Ben-Arush5,6 and
  3. Andrés Martin7,8
  1. Subhadra Evans,
  2. Laura Cousins and
  3. Lonnie Zeltzer

Published Online: 1 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch12

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

How to Cite

Evans, S., Cousins, L. and Zeltzer, L. (2012) Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Children with Cancer, in Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition (eds S. Kreitler, M. W. Ben-Arush and A. Martin), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

  2. 3

    Psychooncology Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

  3. 4

    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel

  4. 5

    Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Meyer Children's Hospital, Israel

  5. 6

    Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Technion Israel-Institute of Technology, the Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel

  6. 7

    Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, USA

  7. 8

    Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 27 JUL 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119998839

Online ISBN: 9781119941033

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Keywords:

  • acupuncture;
  • complementary and alternative medicine;
  • hypnosis;
  • natural products;
  • yoga

Summary

Population studies in the United States and abroad have shown that the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among adults and children for cancer prevention, the slowing of cancer progression, and the palliation of symptoms and side effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of the current chapter is to inform health care professionals about the use of CAM for pediatric cancer by, first of all, defining CAM; second, reviewing the literature on the prevalence of CAM use for pediatric cancer; third, compiling reports of clinical trials of CAM modalities for pediatric cancer; and, finally, describing the clinical use of hypnosis as one example of how a CAM modality can be used in pediatric oncology.