4. Pain in Pediatric Oncology

  1. Shulamith Kreitler4,5,6,
  2. Myriam Weyl Ben-Arush7,8 and
  3. Andrés Martin9,10
  1. Richard D. W. Hain1,2,3

Published Online: 1 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch4

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

How to Cite

Hain, R. D. W. (2012) Pain in Pediatric Oncology, in Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition (eds S. Kreitler, M. W. Ben-Arush and A. Martin), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 4

    School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

  2. 5

    Psychooncology Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

  3. 6

    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel

  4. 7

    Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Meyer Children's Hospital, Israel

  5. 8

    Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Technion Israel-Institute of Technology, the Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel

  6. 9

    Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, USA

  7. 10

    Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wales Paediatric Palliative Medicine Managed Clinical Network, Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, UK

  2. 2

    University of Glamorgan, Wales, UK

  3. 3

    Bangor University, Bangor, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 27 JUL 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119998839

Online ISBN: 9781119941033

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Keywords:

  • morphine;
  • opioids;
  • pain;
  • pain management;
  • PCA;
  • WHO Pain Ladder

Summary

The clinical evidence is accumulating that major opioids can be used safely and effectively in children with moderate to severe pain. They should be used as part of a rational approach to the diagnosis, assessment and management of pain. The WHO Pain Ladder gives a straightforward structure to such an approach and is recommended to all those who wish to approach the management of a child with pain. Good symptom control should be seen as an active intervention which at different stages in the progress of a disease will complement or replace potentially curative interventions. Like them, interventions for symptom control should be a judicious mix of the empirical and the evidence-based but should always be rigorously rational.