9. Psychosocial Interventions: A Cognitive Behavioral Approach

  1. Shulamith Kreitler4,5,6,
  2. Myriam Weyl Ben-Arush7,8 and
  3. Andrés Martin9,10
  1. Bob F. Last1,2 and
  2. Martha A. Grootenhuis3

Published Online: 1 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch9

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition

How to Cite

Last, B. F. and Grootenhuis, M. A. (2012) Psychosocial Interventions: A Cognitive Behavioral Approach, in Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: Psychosocial Aspects and Clinical Interventions, Second Edition (eds S. Kreitler, M. W. Ben-Arush and A. Martin), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119941033.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 4

    School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

  2. 5

    Psychooncology Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

  3. 6

    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel

  4. 7

    Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Meyer Children's Hospital, Israel

  5. 8

    Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Technion Israel-Institute of Technology, the Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel

  6. 9

    Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, USA

  7. 10

    Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Emma Kinderziekenhuis, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Emma Kinderziekenhuis, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 27 JUL 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119998839

Online ISBN: 9781119941033

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Keywords:

  • coping;
  • control;
  • cognitive-behavioral approach;
  • psychosocial intervention

Summary

In childhood cancer, the stresses for the child, the parents and other family members, are severe. For the child, there is the threat to physical integrity, safety, security, and above all, to life. For the parents, there is the threat of losing the child. Research so far has shown that stress reactions are common, but psychopathological disturbances are rarely found in children with cancer or their parents. From this we conclude that most children and parents use coping strategies that protect them from developing psychopathology. In organizing support for families with a child with cancer, much can be learned from children's and parents' cognitions, perceptions and reactions. When problems of adjustment arise, a thorough analysis of how children and parents perceive their situation, as well as an extensive analysis of their coping efforts, is necessary to direct effective supportive actions. Based on a cognitive-behavioral approach a psychosocial support model is outlined which can be helpful in interpreting these emotions and coping strategies.