5. Using the GIS&T Body of Knowledge for Curriculum Design: Different Design for Different Contexts

  1. David J. Unwin2,
  2. Kenneth E. Foote3,
  3. Nicholas J. Tate4 and
  4. David DiBiase5
  1. Steven D. Prager

Published Online: 10 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119950592.ch5

Teaching Geographic Information Science and Technology in Higher Education

Teaching Geographic Information Science and Technology in Higher Education

How to Cite

Prager, S. D. (2011) Using the GIS&T Body of Knowledge for Curriculum Design: Different Design for Different Contexts, in Teaching Geographic Information Science and Technology in Higher Education (eds D. J. Unwin, K. E. Foote, N. J. Tate and D. DiBiase), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119950592.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Geography, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX UK

  2. 3

    Department of Geography, Campus Box 260, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CO 80309 USA

  3. 4

    Department of Geography, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH UK

  4. 5

    John A. Dutton e-Education Institute, 418 Earth-Engineering Sciences Building, Penn State University, University Park PA 16802 USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Geography, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Ave, Laramie WY 82071, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 DEC 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470748565

Online ISBN: 9781119950592

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Keywords:

  • curriculum, course design;
  • GIS&T body of knowledge;
  • GIS&T, government, industry, academic;
  • GIS&T teaching, learning;
  • Body of Knowledge;
  • higher education, GIS&T degree;
  • integrated course design;
  • ILO-based backwards design;
  • data quality

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The GIS&T Body of Knowledge

  • Different contexts require different design

  • Beginning with the end

  • Integrated course design

  • Example 1: map algebra for introduction to GIS

  • Example 2: data quality for K-12 teachers

  • Example 3: ethics and the certification process

  • Integrated design and alignment

  • Conclusion: reconciling needs and context

  • References