134. Centenarians

  1. Alan J. Sinclair2,3,
  2. Dr John E. Morley4 and
  3. Professor Bruno Vellas5
  1. Thomas T. Perls

Published Online: 12 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch134

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

How to Cite

Perls, T. T. (2012) Centenarians, in Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition (eds A. J. Sinclair, J. E. Morley and B. Vellas), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch134

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK

  2. 3

    Institute of Diabetes for Older People (IDOP), Luton, UK

  3. 4

    Saint Louis University School of Medicine and St Louis Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA

  4. 5

    Gérontopôle, Toulouse University Hospital and INSERM Unit 558, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France

Author Information

  1. Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683934

Online ISBN: 9781119952930

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Keywords:

  • Nature;
  • nurture;
  • genes;
  • siblings;
  • genome-wide FOXO3A;
  • CETP;
  • apolipoprotein E4

Summary

Centenarians represent a model of extreme longevity. This allows one to dissect nature versus nurture. Siblings of centenarians tend to be long lived. Certain genes such as apolipoprotein, for example CETP and FOXO3A. are associated with longevity with some groups.