141. Geriatric Occupational Therapy: Achieving Quality in Daily Living

  1. Alan J. Sinclair2,3,
  2. Dr John E. Morley4 and
  3. Professor Bruno Vellas5
  1. Karen F. Barney

Published Online: 12 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch141

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

How to Cite

Barney, K. F. (2012) Geriatric Occupational Therapy: Achieving Quality in Daily Living, in Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition (eds A. J. Sinclair, J. E. Morley and B. Vellas), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch141

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK

  2. 3

    Institute of Diabetes for Older People (IDOP), Luton, UK

  3. 4

    Saint Louis University School of Medicine and St Louis Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA

  4. 5

    Gérontopôle, Toulouse University Hospital and INSERM Unit 558, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France

Author Information

  1. Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683934

Online ISBN: 9781119952930

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Keywords:

  • occupational therapy;
  • elderly;
  • quality of life;
  • activities;
  • participation;
  • continuum of care;
  • health;
  • wellbeing;
  • occupational beings;
  • occupational performance;
  • occupational engagement;
  • navigating life transitions

Summary

The occupational therapy profession intervenes on the basis of humans as occupational beings. Globally, humans are typically identified by what they do. What they do are the activities (occupations) that comprise their lives. Thus, the focus of occupational therapy interventions addresses elders' unique needs and preferences for what they need and want to do in addition to what they are expected to do, typically concurrently with age-related changes and acute and/or chronic conditions. Interventions aim to support the elder's autonomy in setting priorities and making decisions regarding their participation and maintaining a level of mastery and control over their environment and lifestyle. Occupational therapy personnel foster an enabling therapeutic relationship with older adults of all ability levels throughout the continuum of care, together with their families and/or other support systems. The emphasis of occupational therapy on the elder's ability to participate in meaningful occupations promotes cost-effective care, individual competence and optimal quality of life.