69. Control of Chronic Pain

  1. Alan J. Sinclair3,4,
  2. Dr John E. Morley5 and
  3. Professor Bruno Vellas6
  1. Robert D. Helme1 and
  2. Benny Katz2

Published Online: 12 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch69

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

How to Cite

Helme, R. D. and Katz, B. (2012) Control of Chronic Pain, in Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition (eds A. J. Sinclair, J. E. Morley and B. Vellas), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch69

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK

  2. 4

    Institute of Diabetes for Older People (IDOP), Luton, UK

  3. 5

    Saint Louis University School of Medicine and St Louis Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA

  4. 6

    Gérontopôle, Toulouse University Hospital and INSERM Unit 558, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  2. 2

    St Vincent's Hospital and LaTrobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683934

Online ISBN: 9781119952930

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Keywords:

  • chronic pain;
  • older people;
  • epidemiology;
  • classification;
  • pathophysiology;
  • assessment;
  • dementia;
  • analgesics;
  • biopsychosocial management

Summary

Pain is not an inherent part of the ageing process. The increased prevalence of pain in old age is related to the burden of pathology. Pain is considered chronic when it persists beyond the usual time for tissue healing. It may then be associated with adverse outcomes affecting function, emotional state and social situation. A comprehensive assessment is required to ensure that chronic pain is not due to treatable pathology. If pain eradication is not feasible. then the focus shifts to a biopsychosocial approach aiming at optimizing symptom control, function and mood. This is often best achieved with a multidisciplinary approach. This chapter focuses on the assessment of chronic pain and approaches to management.