72. Memory Clinics

  1. Alan J. Sinclair2,3,
  2. Dr John E. Morley4 and
  3. Professor Bruno Vellas5
  1. Antony Bayer

Published Online: 12 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch72

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition

How to Cite

Bayer, A. (2012) Memory Clinics, in Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, Volume 1 & 2, Fifth Edition (eds A. J. Sinclair, J. E. Morley and B. Vellas), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119952930.ch72

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK

  2. 3

    Institute of Diabetes for Older People (IDOP), Luton, UK

  3. 4

    Saint Louis University School of Medicine and St Louis Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA

  4. 5

    Gérontopôle, Toulouse University Hospital and INSERM Unit 558, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France

Author Information

  1. Cardiff University, Cardiff and University Hospital Llandough, Penarth, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683934

Online ISBN: 9781119952930

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • memory clinics;
  • dementia;
  • cognitive impairment;
  • psychometric tests;
  • memory training;
  • anti-dementia drugs

Summary

Memory clinics provide a specialist outpatient-based service offering comprehensive assessment, diagnosis, treatment and advice for people with memory disorders and their families. They also act as a focus for education and research. Much of their activity centres on the diagnosis and management of dementia, typically with emphasis on encouraging earlier presentation, differential diagnosis, appropriate use of drug treatments and psychosocial interventions. Characteristically the clinics are multidisciplinary in nature, with specialist medical input (geriatrician, psychiatrist and/or neurologist), psychologist, nurse and sometimes speech and language therapist, occupational therapist and social worker. The limited published evidence of effectiveness suggests improved quality of life of patients, reduced carer burden, less hospitalization and possible postponement of need for institutional care.