4. Defining a Crime Scene and Physical Evidence Collection

  1. Jane E. Huffman2 and
  2. John R. Wallace3
  1. Jason H. Byrd and
  2. Lerah K. Sutton

Published Online: 10 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119953142.ch4

Wildlife Forensics: Methods and Applications

Wildlife Forensics: Methods and Applications

How to Cite

Byrd, J. H. and Sutton, L. K. (2011) Defining a Crime Scene and Physical Evidence Collection, in Wildlife Forensics: Methods and Applications (eds J. E. Huffman and J. R. Wallace), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119953142.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Northeast Wildlife DNA Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, 18301, USA

  2. 3

    Department of Biology, Millersville University, Millersville, PA 17551, USA

Author Information

  1. William R. Maples Center for Forensic Medicine, Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 DEC 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470662588

Online ISBN: 9781119953142

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Keywords:

  • crime scene, physical evidence;
  • legal principles for evidence;
  • crime scene, illegal act;
  • response effort;
  • securing the scene;
  • physical barriers;
  • Standard Crime Scene Log;
  • “chain of custody” or “chain of evidence”;
  • macro photography

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Definition of a Crime Scene

  • Questions to Be Asked

  • Scene Priority

  • First Responding Officer

  • Securing the Scene

  • Chain of Custody

  • Processing the Scene

  • Initial Documentation

  • Scene Documentation

  • Remains in an Aquatic Environment

  • Collection of Evidence

  • Review of Scene Processing

  • Final Inspection

  • References