17. Use of Electron Beams in Food Preservation

  1. Rajeev Bhat1,
  2. Abd Karim Alias1 and
  3. Gopinadhan Paliyath2
  1. Rajeev Bhat1,
  2. Abd Karim Alias1 and
  3. Gopinadhan Paliyath2

Published Online: 16 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962045.ch17

Progress in Food Preservation

Progress in Food Preservation

How to Cite

Bhat, R., Karim Alias, A. and Paliyath, G. (2012) Use of Electron Beams in Food Preservation, in Progress in Food Preservation (eds R. Bhat, A. Karim Alias and G. Paliyath), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962045.ch17

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Food Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia

  2. 2

    Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Food Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia

  2. 2

    Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655856

Online ISBN: 9781119962045

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Keywords:

  • consumers;
  • decontamination;
  • dose;
  • electron beams;
  • food safety;
  • ionizing radiation;
  • pathogens;
  • radiation processing

Summary

Electron-beam irradiation (EBI) is a novel, non-thermal, physical method of food preservation (processing) technology which is effective in achieving microbial decontamination, insect disinfestation and shelf-life improvement of various food- and agriculture-based commodities. This technology is economical and environmental friendly and holds several advantages over other sources of food irradiation and conventional preservation techniques. Based on the available scientific reports, EBI could prove to be a potential alternative to the current chemical fumigants used for preservation purposes. Reports available have clearly indicated the effectiveness of employing electron beams in preserving the overall qualities and extending the shelf life of various fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes, poultry, meat and seafoods. EBI can be highly effective when combined with other conventional and non-conventional food-processing technologies. Being a recently explored technology, there are still wide gaps prevailing in the body of research that need to be filled to provide appropriate scientific evidence. In the present chapter we aim to highlight a few vital reports on the use of EBI in various food commodities and emphasize certain vital areas which need to be explored in the near future for commercialization purposes and to overcome quarantine barriers of international trade. It is expected that this novel technology will benefit both processors and consumers in the near future.