15. Hemodynamic Monitoring of the Critically Ill Obese Patient

  1. Ali A. El Solh MD, MPH3,4,5
  1. Wim K. Lagrand MD, PhD1,
  2. Eline R. van Slobbe-Bijlsma MD1 and
  3. Marcus J. Schultz MD, PhD2

Published Online: 19 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962083.ch15

Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient

Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient

How to Cite

Lagrand, W. K., van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E. R. and Schultz, M. J. (2012) Hemodynamic Monitoring of the Critically Ill Obese Patient, in Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient (ed A. A. El Solh), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962083.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, USA

  2. 4

    Critical Care Western New York Healthcare System, USA

  3. 5

    Western New York Respiratory Research Center Buffalo, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Intensive Care Adults, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 APR 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655900

Online ISBN: 9781119962083

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Keywords:

  • Hemodynamic monitoring;
  • Critically ill patients;
  • Intensive care unit;
  • Obesity;
  • Cardiac output;
  • Vascular access;
  • Cardiovascular

Summary

Hemodynamic monitoring of critically ill obese patients may be challenging for the critical care physician because of technical and practical difficulties in relation to the increased body weight. Most aspects of hemodynamic monitoring are quite comparable between obese and nonobese patients. The clinician, however, should be aware of the basic pathophysiological principles of the applied monitoring tools. Their theoretical assumptions and calculations may be invalidated because of the body weight and fat distribution. Although methods of hemodynamic data assessment may be more complex in the obese, when indexed for body surface area or (predicted) lean body mass, reliable hemodynamic data are comparable between obese and nonobese individuals. Obesity, therefore, should not complicate the interpretation of hemodynamic data per se.