9. Management of Acute Lung Injury in the Obese Patient

  1. Ali A. El Solh MD, MPH3,4,5
  1. Hallie C. Prescott MD1 and
  2. James M. O'Brien Jr MD, MSc2

Published Online: 19 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962083.ch9

Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient

Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient

How to Cite

Prescott, H. C. and O'Brien, J. M. (2012) Management of Acute Lung Injury in the Obese Patient, in Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient (ed A. A. El Solh), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962083.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, USA

  2. 4

    Critical Care Western New York Healthcare System, USA

  3. 5

    Western New York Respiratory Research Center Buffalo, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 APR 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655900

Online ISBN: 9781119962083

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Keywords:

  • Acute lung injury;
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome;
  • Obesity;
  • Lung-protective ventilation;
  • Low tidal volume

Summary

Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious condition with a high mortality rate. Among critically ill patients, obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the available data do not clearly support an association between obesity and mortality in ALI. Treatment of ALI focuses on minimizing ongoing lung injury through protective ventilation and conservative fluid-management strategies. In the event of profound hypoxemia, many physicians employ additional therapies aimed at increasing oxygenation. High positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and prone positioning improve respiratory physiology in healthy obese patients, so may be considered rational interventions in obese patients with ALI.