25. Neuropsychological Assessment and the Neurologically Impaired Child

  1. William M. Klykylo3 and
  2. Jerald Kay4
  1. Scott D. Grewe1 and
  2. Keith Owen Yeates2

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962229.ch25

Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition

Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition

How to Cite

Grewe, S. D. and Yeates, K. O. (2012) Neuropsychological Assessment and the Neurologically Impaired Child, in Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition (eds W. M. Klykylo and J. Kay), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962229.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Psychiatry, Wright State University School of Medicine, 627 S. Edwin C Moses Blvd, P.O. Box 927, Dayton, OH 45401-0927, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Psychiatry, Wright State University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 927, Dayton, OH 45401-0927, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Sage View Youth Psychology, 1950 Keene Road, Bldg. O, Richland, WA 99352, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, and Center for Biobehavioral Health, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr., Columbus, OH 43205, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 30 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119993346

Online ISBN: 9781119962229

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Keywords:

  • neuropsychological assessment;
  • brain-behavior relationship;
  • neuroimaging;
  • adaptive functioning;
  • attentional;
  • executive;
  • head injury;
  • epilepsy;
  • hydrocephalus;
  • myelomeningocele

Summary

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce neuropsychology and neuropsychological assessment of children, with a focus on neurologically impaired children. Thus, we begin with a brief historical overview of the concept of neurological impairment and neuropsychological assessment in children, and delineate the role of a neuropsychologist in diagnosis and assessment. Next, we offer a set of conceptual principles for neuropsychological assessment, review its related methods and procedures, and describe the differences in purpose and scope of evaluations conducted by school psychologists, clinical child psychologists, and neuropsychologists. After that, we review the neuropsychological outcomes associated with several of the more common childhood neurological disorders. Finally, we examine a neuropsychological management approach and related intervention techniques used to help neurologically impaired children adapt to and compensate for their difficulties.