28. Loss: Divorce, Separation, and Bereavement

  1. William M. Klykylo2 and
  2. Jerald Kay3
  1. Jamie Snyder

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962229.ch28

Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition

Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition

How to Cite

Snyder, J. (2012) Loss: Divorce, Separation, and Bereavement, in Clinical Child Psychiatry, Third Edition (eds W. M. Klykylo and J. Kay), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962229.ch28

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, Wright State University School of Medicine, 627 S. Edwin C Moses Blvd, P.O. Box 927, Dayton, OH 45401-0927, USA

  2. 3

    Department of Psychiatry, Wright State University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 927, Dayton, OH 45401-0927, USA

Author Information

  1. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Post-Pediatric Portal Program, Creighton University/University of Nebraska Training Programs, 3500 S. 91st Street, Lincoln, NE 69520-1429, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 30 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119993346

Online ISBN: 9781119962229

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • divorce;
  • separation;
  • loss;
  • bereavement;
  • grief;
  • mourning;
  • adjustment disorder;
  • major depression;
  • anxiety;
  • post-traumatic stress disorder;
  • family therapy;
  • group therapy;
  • cognitive behavioral therapy

Summary

Almost every young person will experience loss of some type before they reach adulthood. We discuss in some detail the specific losses of separation/divorce and bereavement, epidemiology and recent research in these areas, clinical diagnoses that may arise, and recommended treatment approaches. Large numbers of children continue to grow up in disrupted families, and we recount recent studies of the consequences of divorce, both sociologically and individually. The impact of divorce on a child's development is now recognized as a significant long-term stressor. In detailing the course following bereavement, we describe the concept of “tasks of grief” now widely used to understand the grieving process. It is often challenging to assess what is the “normal” course following loss, so we detail the diagnoses of adjustment disorder and bereavement, and the differential diagnoses that may overlap or supervene, including major depression, anxiety disorders, and disruptive behavior disorders. Treatment must be developed to meet the individual needs of a particular patient and their family. Family therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy are widely used.