6c. Detection of Drugs of Abuse Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

  1. John M. Chalmers3,
  2. Howell G. M. Edwards4 and
  3. Michael D. Hargreaves5
  1. Karen Faulds1 and
  2. W. Ewen Smith1,2

Published Online: 10 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119962328.ch6c

Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy in Forensic Science

Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy in Forensic Science

How to Cite

Faulds, K. and Smith, W. E. (2012) Detection of Drugs of Abuse Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering, in Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy in Forensic Science (eds J. M. Chalmers, H. G. M. Edwards and M. D. Hargreaves), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119962328.ch6c

Editor Information

  1. 3

    VS Consulting, Stokesley, UK

  2. 4

    Chemical and Forensic Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK

  3. 5

    Thermo Scientific Portable Optical Analyzers, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Wilmington, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

  2. 2

    Renishaw Diagnostics Ltd, Nova Technology Park, Glasgow, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470749067

Online ISBN: 9781119962328

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Keywords:

  • drugs of abuse detection, using SERS;
  • Raman scattering, detection of bulk seizures of samples and road side testing;
  • SERS, scattering, orders of magnitude and quenching fluorescence;
  • SERS, rapid, sensitive and molecularly specific methods;
  • colloids, substrate for SERS, reducing interference from contaminants;
  • direct detection of stimulants in sporting events, as amphetamine;
  • key advantage of SERS, sensitive and molecularly specific in crime;
  • indirect detection, antibody or aptamer in indirectly detecting drugs;
  • molecularly specific spectra, in situ identification of drugs and nature of sample

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Substrates

  • Direct Detection

  • Indirect Detection

  • Conclusions

  • References