12. Sickle Cell Anemia

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Scott Roberts MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch12

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Roberts, S. (2012) Sickle Cell Anemia, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • maternal disease;
  • sickle cell anemia, and homozygous SS genotype;
  • sickle cell disease, involving abnormal hemoglobin;
  • red blood cells with hemoglobin S undergoing sickling;
  • hemolysis of defective RBCs;
  • pregnancy, burden to women with sickle hemoglobinopathies;
  • hemolysis, viscosity, and VOC;
  • hemoglobin SC disease;
  • hemoglobin S/β-thalassemia disease

Summary

Sickle cell disease is a member of a family of genetic disorders involving abnormal hemoglobin. The most prevalent hemoglobinopathy is sickle cell anemia resulting from the homozygous SS genotype. Pregnancy is a serious burden to women with sickle hemoglobinopathies, especially those with hemoglobin SS disease. Pregnancy usually results in an increased frequency of sickle cell crises. Infections and pulmonary complications are common. Maternal mortality has decreased dramatically over the years because of improvements in medical care, but remains high.