18. Renal Disease

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. David C. Jones MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch18

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Jones, D. C. (2012) Renal Disease, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • renal disease, risks for fetus, mother;
  • maternal renal disease, during pregnancy;
  • renal function, and physiological changes;
  • vasopressin production, increase in pregnancy;
  • renal disease in pregnancy, primary and secondary;
  • urinary tract, anatomic changes;
  • proteinuria, indicative of renal disease;
  • moderate, severe renal insufficiency;
  • glomerular filtration rate changes, in primary renal disease;
  • dialysis, with renal disease progression

Summary

The presence of maternal renal disease during pregnancy carries risks for both the fetus and the mother. However, over the past 30 years, an improved understanding of the nature of those risks and how they can be best mitigated has led to a change in attitude. This change was summed up in the editorial comment “Children of women with renal disease used to be born dangerously or not at all – not at all if their doctors had their way.” This has been replaced by the recognition that through careful management, the majority of affected women with all but the most severe renal disease have a high likelihood of a successful pregnancy.