2. Maternal Nutrition

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Edward R. Newton MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch2

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Newton, E. R. (2012) Maternal Nutrition, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • maternal nutrition;
  • maternal nutrition with fetal development, and pregnancy outcome;
  • maternal nutrition and perinatal outcome;
  • weak proxy, nutritional status in women;
  • weight gain and BMI, in birthweight, pregnancy outcome;
  • linear fetal growth;
  • fetal growth curves;
  • fetal growth, affected by maternal diet;
  • obesity and adverse pregnancy outcomes;
  • multifetal pregnancy, nutritional demands of the mother

Summary

The purpose of this chapter is to review the associations between maternal nutrition and perinatal outcome. It briefly summarizes the basic concepts of fetal growth, the multiple predictors of fetal growth, the use of maternal weight gain as a measure of maternal nutrition, adverse pregnancy outcomes as they relate to extremes in maternal weight gain, and the importance or controversy related to specific components of the diet (i.e. iron, calcium, sodium, and prenatal vitamins).