23. Asthma

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Michael Schatz MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch23

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Schatz, M. (2012) Asthma, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Allergy, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • asthma, inflammatory disease of the airways;
  • asthma in pregnancy, affecting 4–8%;
  • maternal asthma, and perinatal mortality, preeclampsia risk;
  • pregnancy effect on asthma, optimal intervention;
  • airway obstruction in asthma, mucosal edema, bronchoconstriction;
  • mechanisms for altered clinical course of asthma, unknown;
  • infections in pregnancy, affect on gestational asthma;
  • maternal use of bronchodilators, risk of infant cardiac defects;
  • steps of asthma therapy, in pregnancy;
  • chronic asthma, and acute asthmatic episode prevention

Summary

Recent data suggest that asthma affects 4–8% of pregnant women [1], making it probably the most common, potentially serious medical problem to complicate pregnancy. Moreover, the prevalence of asthma during pregnancy appears to be increasing [1,2]. Although data have been conflicting, the largest recent studies [3-6] have suggested that maternal asthma increases the risk of perinatal mortality, preeclampsia, preterm birth, and low-birthweight infants. More severe asthma is associated with increased risks [3,5], while better controlled asthma is associated with decreased risks [7-11]. The course of asthma may also change during pregnancy; some women improve while others worsen [12]. This chapter reviews the definition and diagnosis of asthma and the interrelationships between asthma and pregnancy as a prelude to discussing the management of asthma in pregnant women.