25. Chronic Hypertension

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Heather A. Bankowski and
  2. Dinesh M. Shah MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch25

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Bankowski, H. A. and Shah, D. M. (2012) Chronic Hypertension, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • chronic hypertension;
  • hypertensive disorders, complications in pregnancy;
  • elevation of arterial blood pressure, to 20th week of gestation;
  • chronic hypertension, diastolic, of 80 mmHg or higher;
  • preconceptional therapy guidelines;
  • baseline assessments;
  • home blood pressure monitoring;
  • antihypertensive medications in chronic hypertension;
  • antepartum fetal evaluation and sonography

Summary

Hypertensive disorders are one of the most serious complications in pregnancy because of the potential to cause serious maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Although a substantial number of hypertensive patients have relatively good outcomes, difficulty in differentiating between various hypertensive conditions, inability to predict which patients are at highest risk, and variability in the progression of preeclampsia make these disorders one of the greatest medical challenges in obstetrics.