28. Malaria

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Richard M. K. Adanu MD, ChB, MPH, FWACS

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch28

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Adanu, R. M. K. (2012) Malaria, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch28

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • malaria, and nonspecific flu-like reaction;
  • malaria, disease caused by Plasmodium;
  • malaria diagnosis in pregnancy, outside holoendemic areas;
  • clinical diagnosis, confirmed with laboratory investigations;
  • quinine and clindamycin for malaria, in first-trimester;
  • malaria, affecting mother and fetus;
  • miscarriages, in first-trimester women with malaria;
  • maternal anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, low birthweight

Summary

Malaria is a disease caused by the protozoon Plasmodium which is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The four species of Plasmodium responsible for malaria are P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for most of the cases of malaria worldwide. It has been reported that, worldwide, there are about 400 million cases of malaria annually with 1–3 million deaths. Malaria in pregnancy is responsible for 75,000–200,000 infant deaths per year. Over 90% of malaria cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa.