29. Group B Streptococcal Infection

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Ronald S. Gibbs MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch29

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Gibbs, R. S. (2012) Group B Streptococcal Infection, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch29

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • GBS infection;
  • GBS, neonatal and maternal genital tract infections;
  • prenatal screening, at 35–37 weeks' gestation;
  • pregnant women with GBS, urinary tract infection, chorioamnionitis;
  • group B streptococci isolation;
  • intrapartum antibiotics, in perinatal GBS;
  • PPROM, fetus or newborn at risk for GBS sepsis;
  • recommended regimen for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, in GBS;
  • algorithm for GBS, intrapartum prophylaxis in PTL;
  • 2010 GBS guidelines

Summary

In the 1970s, group B streptococci dramatically became the leading cause of neonatal infection and an important cause of maternal genital tract infection and septicemia. After the implementation of nationally used prevention guidelines first instituted in 1996, there was a decrease in neonatal deaths of over 70%. New guidelines released in 2002 recommended the single strategy of universal culture-based screening at 35–37 weeks' gestation, and extensively changed antibiotic recommendations. The most recent set of guidelines was released in late 2010.