3. Alcohol and Substance Abuse

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. William F. Rayburn MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch3

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Rayburn, W. F. (2012) Alcohol and Substance Abuse, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • alcohol and substance abuse;
  • alcohol, substance abuse, in reproductive age groups;
  • care of alcohol- or substance-using in pregnancy, difficult;
  • screening for substance use;
  • obstetric, behavior, medical patterns in pregnant women;
  • fetus effects, teratogenic;
  • high alcohol intake in pregnancy, congenital anomalies;
  • psychological and pharmacological treatments;
  • hospital and postpartum care;
  • alcohol and smoking education

Summary

Alcohol and substance abuse are most prevalent in reproductive age adults. Among women aged 15–44, almost 90% have used alcohol, approximately 44% have used marijuana, and at least 14% have used cocaine. Combined 2002–2007 national survey data show that past-month alcohol use among women aged 18–44 was highest for those who were not pregnant and did not have children living in the household (63%) but comparatively low for women in the first trimester of pregnancy (19%), and even lower for those in the second (7.8%) or third trimester (6.2%); similar patterns were seen with marijuana, cigarette, and binge alcohol use. Even though cessation in alcohol, illicit drug use or cigarette smoking usually occurs during pregnancy, some women may not reduce or alter their patterns until pregnancy is confirmed or well under way.