37. Emergency Care

  1. John T. Queenan MD3,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD4 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD5
  1. Garrett K. Lam MD1 and
  2. Michael R. Foley MD2

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch37

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Lam, G. K. and Foley, M. R. (2012) Emergency Care, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch37

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 4

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 5

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • emergency care;
  • incidents of emergency care of gravid patients, difficult;
  • multiple causes for maternal collapse;
  • AFE, DIC, blood product replacement;
  • AFE, catastrophic causes of maternal collapse;
  • DIC, coagulopathic state, consumption of clotting factors;
  • DIC treatment, and blood product replacement;
  • plasma product use, germane to treatment of AFE;
  • obstetric collapse, timing of delivery to salvage fetus;
  • emergency care in pregnancy, myriad causes

Summary

Incidents requiring emergency care of the gravid patient represent some of the most difficult clinical scenarios faced by the practicing clinician. There are multiple causes for maternal collapse, and commonly the clinical situation is so dire that there is no time for a detailed diagnostic work-up. Attempts to resuscitate the mother are the starting point for intervention; however, as the resuscitation progresses, consideration of fetal well-being must be addressed. It is not the intention of the authors to cover all causes of obstetric emergencies in a single chapter. Instead, we focus on amniotic fluid embolism and the management of its sequelae: disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, blood product replacement, and perimortem cesarean delivery as prototypical examples of obstetric emergency care as their attendant management principles and guidelines are applicable to most obstetric emergencies.