41. Prevention of Preterm Birth

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Paul J. Meis MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch41

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Meis, P. J. (2012) Prevention of Preterm Birth, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch41

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • prevention of preterm birth;
  • preterm birth, as livebirth before 37 weeks' gestation;
  • USA, and preterm birth, marked racial disparity;
  • preterm birth, and death of newborn, with no birth defects;
  • prevention of preterm birth, in France;
  • preterm birth as a social phenomenon, and low socio-economic status;
  • infection and/or inflammation and preterm birth;
  • cervical changes and preterm birth, weakness in retaining fetus;
  • progesterone prophylactic, effective reproducible treatment

Summary

Preterm birth is defined as a livebirth before 37 completed weeks' gestation. Preterm births can be classified by their apparent etiology as spontaneous preterm labor and delivery, constituting approximately 45% of preterm births; births occurring after spontaneous premature preterm rupture of the fetal membranes, approximately 35% of preterm births; and preterm births that result from a medical or obstetric complication of the pregnancy, approximately 20% of preterm births. Based on common risk factors for their occurrence, it may be appropriate to consider those births caused by spontaneous preterm labor and premature preterm rupture of the fetal membranes as a single entity and likely to be caused by similar pathogeneses.