43. Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes

  1. John T. Queenan MD3,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD4 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD5
  1. Brian M. Mercer BA, MD, FRCSC, FACOG1,2

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch43

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Mercer, B. M. (2012) Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch43

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 4

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 5

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Metro Health Medical Center, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Reproductive Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM);
  • rupture of fetal membranes, before labor;
  • spontaneous membrane rupture, weakening of membranes;
  • women suffering PPROM, recurrence in future pregnancies;
  • membrane rupture diagnosis, sterile speculum examination;
  • cervical cultures;
  • delivery after PPROM, in clinical chorioamnionitis;
  • management of woman with PROM;
  • cerclage, risk factor for PROM;
  • cessation of leakage with membrane resealing

Summary

Rupture of fetal membranes before the onset of labor (premature rupture of membranes) complicates 8–10% of pregnancies, and is responsible for nearly one-third of preterm births. Premature rupture of membranes, especially preterm premature rupture of membranes, has been associated with brief latency from membrane rupture to delivery, an increased risk of chorio-amnionitis, and umbilical cord compression. As such, preterm premature rupture of membranes is associated with increased risk of perinatal complications. An understanding of gestational age-dependent risks of delivery, the risks and potential benefits of conservative management, and opportunities to reduce complications of preterm birth will help clinicians improve outcomes after this common pregnancy complication.