46. Prolonged Pregnancy

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Teresa Marino MD and
  2. Errol R. Norwitz MD, PhD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch46

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Marino, T. and Norwitz, E. R. (2012) Prolonged Pregnancy, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch46

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

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Keywords:

  • labor and delivery complications;
  • prolonged pregnancy;
  • timely onset of labor, delivery, and perinatal outcome;
  • prolonged, postterm pregnancy, beyond 42 weeks 0 days;
  • complications of postterm pregnancy;
  • antepartum stillbirths;
  • maternal risks of prolonged pregnancy;
  • postterm pregnancy, accurate gestational age assessment;
  • postterm fetus, intrapartum fetal heart rate abnormalities

Summary

The timely onset of labor and delivery is an important determinant of perinatal outcome. Both preterm births (defined as delivery prior to 37 weeks' gestation) and postterm births (defined as delivery after 42 weeks' gestation) are associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality. Much attention has been paid to the problem of preterm birth despite the observation that antepartum stillbirths account for more perinatal deaths than either complications of prematurity or sudden infant death syndrome, and the fact that the risks of postterm pregnancy can be easily avoided by earlier induction of labor. This chapter reviews in detail the risks of continuing pregnancy beyond the due date, the option of induction of labor, and the management of low-risk postterm pregnancies.