47. Induction of Labor

  1. John T. Queenan MD2,
  2. Catherine Y. Spong MD3 and
  3. Charles J. Lockwood MD4
  1. Nicole M. Petrossi and
  2. Deborah A. Wing MD

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch47

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Petrossi, N. M. and Wing, D. A. (2012) Induction of Labor, in Queenan's Management of High-Risk Pregnancy: An Evidence-Based Approach, Sixth Edition (eds J. T. Queenan, C. Y. Spong and C. J. Lockwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119963783.ch47

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 3

    Bethesda, MD, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655764

Online ISBN: 9781119963783

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • induction of labor;
  • indications, maternal or fetal in nature;
  • elective induction of labor;
  • cesarean delivery, following elective induction;
  • contraindications to labor induction;
  • pediatric concerns in induced labor, neonatal respiratory compromise;
  • criteria, gestational age and/or fetal pulmonary maturity;
  • preinduction assessment;
  • failed induction;
  • induction of labor, risk factor for uterine rupture

Summary

One of the most routinely performed obstetric procedures in the United States is induction of labor. This procedure involves iatrogenic stimulation of uterine contractions prior to the onset of spontaneous labor to accomplish vaginal delivery. Increasing the frequency and improving the intensity of existing uterine contractions in a patient who is in labor and not progressing sufficiently is referred to as augmentation of labor. From 1990 to 2007, there was a sharp increase in the frequency of labor induction, from 9.5% to 22.8%. The principal reason for this increase is the availability of superior cervical ripening agents and an increase in bona fide indications for induction of labor (e.g. preterm premature rupture of the membranes at term and postdates pregnancies), as well as a more relaxed attitude toward marginal indications for induction, and clinician's and/or patient's desire to arrange an opportune time of delivery.