14. Land Plants: New Theoretical Directions and Empirical Prospects

  1. Richard M. Sibly2,
  2. James H. Brown3 and
  3. Astrid Kodric-Brown3
  1. Brian J. Enquist and
  2. Lisa Patrick Bentley

Published Online: 27 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781119968535.ch14

Metabolic Ecology: A Scaling Approach

Metabolic Ecology: A Scaling Approach

How to Cite

Enquist, B. J. and Bentley, L. P. (2012) Land Plants: New Theoretical Directions and Empirical Prospects, in Metabolic Ecology: A Scaling Approach (eds R. M. Sibly, J. H. Brown and A. Kodric-Brown), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119968535.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Reading, UK

  2. 3

    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Arizona, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470671535

Online ISBN: 9781119968535

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Keywords:

  • land plants, new theoretical directions;
  • scaling relationships, levels of plant biology;
  • plant scaling;
  • models of plant geometry, demography, and thinning law;
  • botanical scaling;
  • WBE model;
  • botanical scaling normalizations;
  • leaf allometry normalization;
  • MTE scaling to ecosystem dynamics

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Summary

  • Introduction

  • Plant Scaling: Historical

  • Overview

  • Examples of Botanical Scaling: From Anatomy and Physiology to Ecosystems

  • Origin of Botanical Scaling Exponents: West, Brown, and Enquist Model

  • Origin of Botanical Scaling Normalizations: Merging of WBE2 with Trait - Based Plant Ecology

  • What have We Learned Since 1997 and 1999?

  • Scaling Up to Populations, Communities, and Ecosystems

  • Acknowledgments

  • Conclusions